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Property Hawk

The loss of mortgage interest relief

A number of users have contacted us to share their concern over the proposed tax changes in the Budget that will limit and then remove the ability to off-set BTL mortgage interest payments against rental profits.

One of our users, who understandably wishes to remain anonymous, has outlined how losing the ability to off-set mortgage interest rate is critical to his business model. In his words - 'I've worked so hard to build up my portfolio for my pension and my children just in essence to have it taken away. I'm sure you can see my stance on the subject.'

We thank him for his considerable research, and want to put his specific situation out there, to see whether other landlords have any thoughts or suggestions on how they will need to change their business in light of these changes.

Here is his letter and the responses he received



“Hi Property Hawk
 
I've been a subscriber of your newsletter for years and read it every week! I've been having a few issues with the new proposed changes to legislation of tax on buy to let properties and so far not really found a clear answer. I've spoke with NLA and not much help there, so I am kind of stuck. The situation looming I don't think many people realise is huge and I'm extremely concerned. I've spoke with my accountant and a few others and there is no real set solution so far it seems.

Have a look at my example/position as I know more people will be facing the same problem:
 
Example of my loss of mortgage interest relief
 
For simplicity sake I've just assumed no tax allowance so 20% on up to 50k and 40k on anything over.
 
Problem I'm facing is my rent is approx 200k a year, with 150k say interest payment -- so a simplified version with no tax break etc

Currently 50k Profit @ 20% tax = £10k tax
 
New system would be:
 
200k In rent, 10k on first 50k (50k @ 20%)  and 40% on the other 150k - 60k totalling 70K tax
 
minus 150k - 20% tax relief 30k = 40k Tax  

So my tax is going up by 4 times and doesn't make it worth it, its unfair as it is run as a business.

Any ideas??

However 50k profit - 40k tax is still 10k Profit

Worse situation is when interest rates go up and say I am paying 170k in interest payments I’m facing 70k tax minus 34k relief (£170k @ 20% ) so tax is 36k however I'm only making 30k thus a 6k loss in total.


He got this response from a senior tax expert:

Firstly, your calculation of the worst case impact is correct.  Based on mortgage interest of £150,000, the total tax hit will be £30,000 p.a. i.e. a 20% tax restriction on his mortgage interest deductions.  The rules are being phased in over 5 years, so this will not be an immediate impact and it allows some time to adapt to the changes.

The article that he has found is a pretty good summary of the situation and the possible alternatives available to him:

1. Does his wife have any unused tax allowances or basic rate band?  If so, transferring a larger interest in the properties to her would help to avoid the tax increase, because basic rate taxpayers are not affected by the restriction on interest deductions;

2. Is he able to manage his salary and dividends from the trading company to keep below the basic rate band?  Again, this could include transferring some income to his wife if appropriate;

3. It may be worth looking at selling one or two of the properties and using that to reduce the debt on the others.  The ones you would look at selling would be those that are contributing least profit i.e. where rental income minus mortgage interest is lowest.  Properties like this would have worked better when there was a full tax deduction for the interest, but following the changes they could actually end up costing money after tax.  I appreciate this means reducing the number of properties and hence the potential for future capital growth, but it is probably worth a close review of his portfolio to see if now might be a good time to exit from any of them.

4.  It may be appropriate for some investors to incorporate all or part of their property portfolio.  This is a pretty big step and in most cases I would not recommend putting residential property in a company for various reasons (stamp duty, higher overall capital gains tax on a sale etc) but in some circumstances it might work.

Unfortunately I don’t think there is a silver bullet to solve this situation, but we are still looking out for any better ideas.


Our user, got this back from his local MP


 The Politicians response to loss of mortgage interest relief

Answer on mortgage interest changes from Parliament

A constituent contacted you concerned about changes announced in the Budget that affect landlords: specifically, restricting the relief on finance costs that landlords of residential property can get to the basic rate of tax. You asked for a basic explanation of the changes and whether the constituent’s assessment of how this change could increase someone’s tax was accurate.

The restriction announced in the March Budget on the amount that landlords of residential property can claim in tax relief will almost certainly increase your constituent’s tax bill assuming that he is operating as an individual and not as a company. However the measure is due to be phased in over a number of years and it is possible that your constituent might benefit from reducing the amount of his outstanding mortgage/s and/or changing the ownership of the properties to a company structure.
 
What is this measure?

The Budget report sets out the context for this measure as follows: (Budget 2015, HC 264, March 2015 para 1.190-1)
 
Landlords can deduct costs they incur when calculating the tax they pay on their rental income. A large portion of those costs are interest payments on the mortgage. Mortgage Interest Relief was withdrawn from homeowners 15 years ago. However, landlords still receive the relief. The ability to deduct these costs puts investing in a rental property at an advantage. Tax relief for finance costs is particularly beneficial for wealthier landlords with larger incomes, as every £1 of finance cost they incur allows them to pay 40p or 45p less tax … The government will restrict the relief on finance costs that landlords of residential property can get to the basic rate of income tax. The restriction will be phased in over 4 years, starting from April 2017. This will reduce the distorting effect the tax treatment of property has on investment and mean individual landlords are not treated differently based on the rate of income tax that they pay. It will also shift the balance between landlords and homeowners.
 
Details on how this will work are given in HMRC’s Tax Information & Impact Note: Restricting finance cost relief for individual landlords, 8 July 2015:
 
Legislation will be published in Summer Finance Bill 2015 to restrict deductions from property income for finance costs for residential properties for individuals and to introduce a tax reduction at the basic rate of Income Tax.
 
Deductions from property income will be restricted to:

  • 75% for 2017 to 2018
  • 50% for 2018 to 2019
  • 25% for 2019 to 2020
  • 0% for 2020 to 2021 and beyond

 
Individuals will be able to claim a basic rate tax reduction from their Income Tax liability on the portion of finance costs not deducted in calculating the profit. In practice this tax reduction will be calculated as 20% of the lower of the:

  • finance costs not deducted from income in the tax year (25% for 2017 to 2018, 50% for 2018 to 2019, 75% for 2019 to 2020 and 100% thereafter)
  • profits of the property business in the tax year
  • total income (excluding savings income and dividend income) that exceeds the personal allowance and blind person’s allowance in the tax year

 
Any excess finance costs may be carried forward to following years if the tax reduction has been limited to 20% of the profits of the property business in the tax year.
 
Provision for this measure is made by clause 24 of the Finance Bill 2015; details are given in the explanatory notes to the Bill.
 

Is the constituent’s calculation correct?

The constituent estimates how much tax would be charged on taxable income totalling £200,000. However, at the moment, we do not know what the thresholds will be for the three rates of income tax, assuming no change is made to the rates of tax themselves by 2021 when the measure will be fully implemented.
 

Is there a proposal to restrict relief on equivalent interest payments made by companies?

No. As made clear in HMRC’s ‘tax information note’ cited above, the change is to affect deductions from property income for finance costs for residential properties for individuals – and “there is no additional impact on business.” It is likely that some individuals may respond to these changes by incorporating their businesses.
 

The possible effect of rising interest rates.

Your constituent mentions the possibility that any future rise in mortgage interest rates will further reduce his profits and perhaps even force him into a loss. Given that the bank rate has been at a record low level of 0.5% since March 2009 it is likely that the rate will rise. There is still considerable uncertainty over when the first rise will be and how great the increase is likely to be. However given the extremely low level of the current rate any rise, even a relatively modest 0.25%, would have a quite considerable percentage rise for mortgage payers.
 
I would just mention in passing that as well as the profits your constituent experiences on the rental income it is highly likely that the value of the properties will have increased over the years. It is unclear from his email precisely how long your constituent has owned his portfolio of properties but he does give the impression that it has been over a considerable number of years. There are no current plans to alter the rate of any Capital Gains Tax payable on the properties.
 
I hope that this is of assistance.
Mike Amesbury
Senior Parliamentary Assistant
 
Angela Rayner MP
Ashton-under-Lyne
House of Commons
London
SW1A OAA


 

So what are Property Hawk's thoughts -

Examples of loss of mortgage interest relief for landlords

The Investors Chronicle published useful article setting out several examples of how the restriction on mortgage interest relief will effect landlords.  As outlined above the restrictions start in 2017-18 tax year and will become fully effective by 2020-21.  To see the worked examples have a look here.

How will landlords respond to the tax changes?

A recent survey by Rentify of landlords attitudes following the budget tax changes expect rents to rise with 21% of landlords expressing the view that they are extremely likely to increase rents. Whilst 35% are ‘somewhat likely’ to up their rents. 

I personally think that the picture will be far more mixed.  I can see London landlords, who are highly leveraged being forced to increase their rents to recap some of their tax losses in future years.  Previously, they might have been some what more laissez faire, content to generate what was seen as a reasonable rates of return.  In other areas of the country where rental demand is less high, landlords may struggle to pass on any substantive element of the extra tax charge to their tenants.

Dealing with removal of higher rate mortgage interest rate relief.

1. Consider converting your buy-to-let to a furnished holiday let

Sometimes being a landlord life throws you a curved ball.  It’s how you deal with these things and sometimes this may involve a little lateral thinking.  I’m currently buying a property, which is equally suitable as a buy-to-let property and also a holiday let.  Luckily it’s located in a tourist hotspot near the centre of Bakewell in the Peak District.  Having viewed the recent tax changes my approach to letting this property has been clarified.  I will not be letting it as a buy-to-let because my intention is to take a significant mortgage in the realm of 75% Loan to value.  On the purchase price of £300,000 this would give me a buy-to-let loan of £225,000 and a whopping tax liability under the new proposed tax system of  £3-4,000 a year which will clearly push me into a income loss for this as a stand alone investment. 

On the other hand I have no experience of holiday lets so this will be a new business venture for me. Sometimes though with business you have to take up new challenges as they present themselves.  The big advantage of Furnished Holiday Lets is that they are treated as a trade although HMRC are keen to point out that they are not a trade.  As a trade a landlord has the ability to offset all their interest payments as a business expense.  There are also other expenses over and above those allowable to a trade than are available to a buy-to-let landlord.

Clearly, not all areas or buy-to-lets will be suitable as holiday lets.  However, in London and certain towns or areas turning your buy-to-let into a holiday let may be away of retaining the full tax advantages of offsetting your interest payments.  Short term lets may present an alternative to those landlords who are looking to find a profitable way of renting out their space. Just witness the rise of Airbnb.

2. Move into one of your buy-to-let’s

It might be a drastic step but if you don’t have a residential mortgage then you may want to look at moving home.  For many landlords this may not be practical. This is because you’re buy-to-let’s are not suitable family accommodation or where you want to live.  However, it could be a way of wiping out the extra tax liability that a large mortgage on a buy-to-let loan now may represent.

3. Holding your portfolio in a company

There are many disadvantages of holding buy-to-let property in a limited company, not least the considerable administrative cost and responsibilities of running a company.  The main advantage of holding buy-to-let property in a company is that rental profits are taxed at the corporation rate; which is currently 20% and due to drop to 18% by 2020. Holding properties in a company is particularly tax efficient where profits are retained to purchase more properties in the company.  The advantage of holding a buy-to-let in a company is that a landlord is able to off set their full amount of mortgage interest against their profits.  When a landlord looks to distribute the profits; which would be taxed at the presiding level of corporation tax they would have to pay income tax at their marginal rate.  For many this would be much less than the proposed system of tax on turnover.

4. Use your partners tax advantages if they are paying tax at a lower marginal rate

If you transfer some of your property or an element of it to a partner to take advantage of their tax allowances then this could cut your overall tax liability.  Remember one of the options is to split the rent
which could substantially reduce your personal rental profit for your rental business.

5. Lobby your MP and politicians

This change is not a done deal.  If you believe in democracy there is still time to change the policy so make a song and dance about it and lobby your MP and politicians and  sign the online petition for the Governement to reconsider changes to mortgage interest relief.

Why has the Chancellor acted on higher rate mortgage interest tax?

I can see reasons why the Chancellor has decided to act now and that the action could be unilaterally targeted at just higher rate tax payers. 

Here are some of them:

1. The Chancellor has seen that there is a possibility for higher rate tax payers leveraging up to buy large or expensive property (particularly in London) and use this borrowing power and low rates of interest to then make significant rental profits with large interest rate tax breaks.  This is both politically unpopular with ‘generation rent’ who feel that they are being priced out of the housing market.  It is also perceived as an unfair tax advantage for landlords who were seen as being able to offset their interest payments against their tax bill in a way that homeowners couldn’t since the abolition of MIRAS.

2. The removal of the higher rate mortgage interest relief could potentially save the government money through tax relief.  Figures aren’t available and his actions may have a counter productive impact as many landlords may be put off purchasing a buy-to-let property or adding to their portfolio.  In addition some landlords will sell.  This will then reduce the potential tax take.

3. The fazing out of this tax break is seen as a way of taking the heat out of house price growth, particularly in the capital, which has been significant over the last decade where landlords have been significant purchasers of property.

4. It addresses one of the worries that a buy-to-let bubble may have been forming where people were lured in to taking large debts to build up buy-to-let portfolios and using the low debt level to arbitrage rental profits.  Many of these investors could be exposed to a sudden rise in interest rates when the current low rate environment changes representing a sizeable systemic risk to the economy and banking system.

Is the removal of higher rate interest rate justified?

In my eyes, renters and homeowners fail to appreciate that buy-to-let is a not an investment but a micro business.  A landlord, however big or small, gives up a lot to get a buy-to-let property up and running - the potential of investing their money in an alternative investments, the fun of spending hard earned money as well as a putting themselves at considerable exposure to financial risk. Will they get tenants?  How will these tenants (customers) perform?  There are financing risks in terms of the costs of any loan, as well as the risk of capital loss.  There is also considerable work involved in maintaining and letting out property.  Managing a BTL property is not a passive investment.

The worry is, this latest move by Osbourne is only the precursor to a blanket removal of the facility for landlords to offset mortgage interest costs. The next step could be to extend this change to basic rate tax payers, to bring the tax treatment for landlords to that of homeowners instead of business owners. 

This would place a landlord's tax treatment into a weird in-between place, although running a business they will no longer be treated as such by the tax system.  A confusing tax policy that would not be justifiable.  Tax policy however is full of these anomalies, and unfortunately landlords cannot bank on things changing any time soon.

Your thoughts please.



Comments (13)

Mortgage interest relief
This was introduced 5 years ago in Southern Ireland. Today we have a huge shortage of accommodation in the major cities for this reason (and some others). It is likely to be scrapped in the next budget to try and kick start reinvestment in the sector.
#1 - Ros - 08/28/2015 - 15:38
I got an idea
Everyone put the d*mn rent higher to balance out the tax!

If you raise it accordingly, you should still make the same amount.

They play dirty, so can we.
#2 - Moe - 08/28/2015 - 17:21
Mortgage interest relief
During my lifetime my wife and I have owned and run three businesses, all started from scratch. At no time have we borrowed money to start or expand those businesses. We retired at 53 and live comfortably, financed by a small portfolio of properties and owe nothing. This is the polar opposite to the example above but is sustainable no matter what the chancellor does short of taxing all rental income at 80%. Am I unsympathetic? You bet I am.
#3 - Alan - 08/28/2015 - 17:50
Sell, sell, sell
Sorry but a business with mortgage interest payments of £150,000 which will go into liquidation if it is forced to pay £30,000 more in tax is a failing business and a very lucky one. An increase in BOE base rate to 1% would probably have the same effect as mortgage interest relief reduction on this business (to raise expenses by £30,000).

If this business was founded on the expectation that BOE base rate would be 0.5% for years, it's been very very lucky business.
#4 - Simon - 08/28/2015 - 19:01
Deja Vu
As mentioned above,The Republic brought this in at 75% of interest allowable coupled with draconian taxes on Landlords has seen an exodus of landlords triggering a severe shortage of rental properties.When will Govt a stop interfering in the property market,allowing interest relief is allowed in any other business.
Reagans quote that the 9 scariest words in the English language seem apt "I'm from the government and I'm here to help"
#5 - Shark Trager - 08/28/2015 - 19:46
Thanks to that chap Alan for the perspective
And making his "I'm alright Jack" post above and letting everyone know how he feels somewhat superior to anyone who has used leverage to build their property business.

The implications of the tax changes are a concern, but not as big a concern as the possibility of turning into the sort of Jackass who judges others who are in a less fortunate position than themselves.

Anyway, I haven't decided exactly what I will do yet, but I know this much - There is an opportunity in this somewhere, our job as investors is where to find it.

May seem like an entirely ill wind. Maybe, maybe not. "No one can change the direction of the wind, but we can all adjust the set of our sails"
#6 - Stuart - 08/28/2015 - 21:33
Tax Planning
There are three perfectly legitimate Tax Planning solutions that don't involve CGT, transfer of ownership, Trusts, SDLT, refinancing or management companies. I have the details of all three but cannot disclose because I am subject to an NDA containing a "Wrotham Park" style clause. Nevertheless, I've still decided to sell up and live in the Med as a tax exile for other personal reasons. The key issue for most is the cost of the advice and implementation, it is 1% of gross portfolio value £50,000 minimum so it is only cost effective for the bigger players. Email mark@property118.com for an intro.
#7 - Mark Alexander - 08/28/2015 - 21:41
Thanks to that chap Alan
Maybe Stuart wuldn't think I was quite so lucky if he had faced mortgage interest of 16% on his home as we did in the 70's. It was hard work that got us here and the harder we worked the luckier we got!
#8 - Alan - 08/29/2015 - 15:06
Continue to grow?
I suspect that we'll see more and more BTL products coming on to the market for limited companies.

The way I see it is this will push more and more landlords to incorporate, the first lender on the market with comparable products to indiviual BTL products will gain a foothold in the door, I know there are a few that already do limited company BTLs but they seem expensive, Kent reliance for example. If the lenders are worried about security on the individuals, they could just take out a directors guarantee, that effectively makes the mortgage the same as an individual BTL.

I admit there are other costs in preparing accounts but these are balanced out by lower corporation tax, the £5000 tax relief on the dividend should help as well, just a pity he's put another 7.5% tax on distributions.

Yet another government that wants to subdue growth in a business area, there's been calls to wipe this relief out altogether, maybe this is the first step down that road?

I guess I'm lucky in that I only have a small portfolio and I should still remain in the 20% tax bracket, the question is do I want to remain in the 20% bracket?
#9 - Chris - 08/30/2015 - 07:39
Not everywhere is like London
I didn't have very large mortgages on my proepties when I bought them, but falling house prices in my part fo the country means that I'd barely cover them now if I sold. So really I'm caught between a rock and a hard place. I have some good tenants whom I don't want to have to make homeless. Many people round here have to rent as they are on low pay or zero hour contracts etc. No other EU country as far as I can tell punishes the private rented sector - in fact, in other EU countries landlords are treated like "real" businesses from a tax point of view. Moving properties into a Ltd Co is also very expensive - higher interest rates, stamp duty, but for me, anyway, enough negative CGT to last a lifetime. That's the only plus.
#10 - Kath - 09/01/2015 - 18:21
Chris - Continue to grow?
I think this is definately the first step down that road. If there is no backtrack on this unfair tax, then the principal has been established and Osbourne or others can do what they want with it.
#11 - Colin Dartnell - 09/04/2015 - 09:10
Valuable post . I was enlightened by the insight , Does anyone know if my company might be able to locate a fillable IRS 1040 - Schedule C version to use ?
#12 - Ahmad Sizemore - 11/23/2015 - 01:37
They will come after Ltd Companies
Be careful if your considering Ltd Companies as they may/will come after those next I guess. OK so living in the North we will see
1. Rents Rise to Offset Tax but maybe not as market conditions are way different than LONDON
2. More Properties on the market to sell as Landords cannot meet the new Tax Demand
3. More Properties on the market will bring down house prices which in turn will result in more negative equity for many (even the ones who arent landords).
4. More and more properties in need of renovation and no one will touch them becasue you cannot get a return from the letting them.
5. Property Purchases will slum.
6. Lenders will start shaking with more negative equity.

and all most of wanted to do was to invest in property rather than silly NON RETURN pension schemes.

Welcome back to the next Recession.

OSBOURNE you just blown it.....
#13 - Nick - 12/11/2015 - 08:39
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It looks like ‘Austerity’ …..‘Prudence’s’ long lost sister is on ...
The Section 21 Notice has not been the easiest of things for landlords to get right. Using the right o...
In the week that the Land Registry released historic data going back 18 years, I thought I would share...
Rebecca Brough solicitor at Fidler and Pepper highlights the potential dangers and consequences of the...
It appears that landlords are starting to fight back over unfair licensing charges by some local autho...
Access to finance is key When I started as a landlord the key for me was access to ...
Prospective property investors thinking of dipping their toes into the residential property market, or...
Longer tenancies?  Sounds like bliss to most landlords. Most of use love the thought of long-term...
The section 21 notice is a powerful tool. It is the one document that gives a landlord the certainty o...
When is a landlord not a landlord? Well the obvious answer is when they are a leaseholder.  ...
Creeping landlord licensing is on its’ way affecting many landlords.  A perfect example is ...
I was talking to one of the waitresses in my local.  She is so excited! She’s ...
Tenancy agreements are our thing.  We have been providing a free tenancy agreement to the landlor...
The latest projections see no immediate end to the long run of low interest rates.  This week Mar...
Our Property Manager software has come on leaps and bounds since we first developed it as free propert...
In these tough financial times some landlords may be looking at how they can pull in a few extra quid ...
The Government's latest proposals are to introduce a statutory obligation on landlords to check whethe...
Many landlords have been thrown into confusion over the last few months as tightening legislation and ...
I love being a landlord.  I’ve recently set up another new business.  I work ...
According to figures from the Dogs Trust, 46% of the population currently own a pet.  Now assumin...
Recently, I was talking to a new landlord about their first ever tenants.  They had been chuffed ...
Should I use a letting agent? The perennial debate amongst landlords is should I use a lettin...
Landlords who may be thinking about buying into purpose built student accommodation should stop and th...
Landlords are increasingly often under a time pressure. With the burgeoning regulatory requirements of...
Most of us ‘hard bitten’ landlords get fed up with the endless splurge of meaningless head...
Are rents about to fall? Landlords have been insulated from many of the harsh economic winds since the...
Tenancy Deposits – ESSENTIALS I’ve recently had a scare over one of my tenants de...
The queen is dead! Yes off course I'm referring to Margaret Thatcher.  Now she never sai...
Landlord Insurance Minefield My landlord insurance falls due this month.  As u...
We have frequently expressed opposition to a blanket landlord registration scheme - the ‘so call...
We’ve all had it - the phone goes, it’s one of your tenants’.  Do you:...
Better The Devil You Know?   I've recently advertised my rental property follo...
I was contacted this week by a fraught landlord who was the subject to a negligence claim from their t...
The buy-to-let mortgage market has gone from bust to boom again over the last few years.  With le...
This is a regular discussion point amongst many landlords.  Those that have been dissatisfied wit...
It's a landlords’ dread!   A nice respectable looking tenant, with a good...
Rebecca Brough of Fidler and Pepper Solicitors asks whether landlords need a tenant guarantor, and exp...
The thing with managing a portfolio of buy-to-let property is that for much of the time you don't have...
Brings Threats and Opportunities Many landlords are adopting a wait and see approach to the G...
Severe rental arrears fell by almost 16 per cent in the fourth quarter of 2012 according to data from ...
Should a landlord let their tenants smoke? Landlords are acutely aware of the bad smells and ...
New Year celebrations are well and truly over, so it’s back to work, and for many landlords, sma...
I was thinking today, what would be the top 5 things I would wish for next year as a landlord.  S...
You may think that as a landlord you are not liable for your tenants’ water bill. Well up until ...
I can't begin to explain how fraught the last few weeks have been.  Most part time landlords will...
The buy-to-let mortgage market has been in the doldrums for several years after the ‘crash&rsquo...
Rebecca Brough of Fidler and Pepper explores the world of fees and charges in respect to a landlords ...
Don’t forget your section 213 notice! Property Hawk has been urging landlord not to forget about...
You are just about to let your buy-to-let.  So what are the essential bits of paper work that you...
Is there such as thing as the ‘fair wear and tear’ of your buy-to-let property? ...
Landlords looking to obtain possession have two basic choices when trying to get their buy-to-let prop...
So it all goes wrong!  The tenant moves out (disappears) and owes you months of rent.  They ...
We recently had a enquiry on the Landlord Forum asking whether it was a good idea to serve a section 2...
Landlords seeking possession frequently have to decide between the merits of using a Section 21 notice...
Renewing a tenancy is one of the most straightforward aspects of managing a tenancy.  But many la...
Getting possession of a rental property when your tenant falls into rent arrears Th...
I read recently on a landlord forum a suggestion from one disgruntled tenant that landlords should be ...
My latest round of tenant gripes has hit me after a relatively quiet period. I suppose it was...
After launching the new version of the property management software we felt the actual site pages look...
Rental yields have always been a critical metric when evaluating a buy-to-let investment and they are...
Any landlord who follows London politics will not have escaped the fact that the private rented sector...
I was chatting this week to my joiner Steve. He was having a nightmare! Steve had done most o...
The Co-op announced last week that it was stepping up lending into the buy-to-let mortgage market by a...
Legislation should be in place by the end of the year to allow landlords to benefit from the Green Dea...
It's January which means only one thing for most landlords, yes it’s time to get to grips with t...
As the year comes to an end many landlords will be drawing up their plans for 2012. With the ...
I was contacted several weeks ago by one of our longstanding users. Kevin wrote to highlight ...
I'm like the majority of small landlords in that I have opted to use the Deposit Protection Scheme (DP...
Europe is at it again! Not content with their crazy project “Euro”  putting ...
You might be aware that I’ve had a number of new tenants recently. This has i...
It’s a great time to be a landlord. Many of us including me are making record rental pr...
I was contacted last week by a landlord looking to gain access to their bu...
I’ve written before about landlords not needing to use a letting agent. We al...
It's been a while since I've had a new tenant move in. The new tenant seems amiable enough. A middle a...
My landlord insurance fell due at the beginning of this month. DAMMM! Yet again the dilemma. ...
It is possible to get a company to fill out your N5B.  This will cost anything upwards of £...
Most landlords use an Assured Shorthold Tenancy agreement to let their property. So how long ...
I've been looking at some recent enquiries from landlords who use our Property Management software to ...
Most landlords who let a property that is tenanted will not be liable for council tax.  This is b...